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A clean & simple MVVM solution for state management using Provider package.

PMVVM is a Flutter package for simple and scalable state management based on the MVVM pattern, it uses Provider & Hooks under the hood. PMVVM serves the same purpose BloC, but unlike BloC it doesn’t require too much boilerplate.

It's worth mentioning that the package adopts some concepts from the Stacked package, but with a much simpler and cleaner approach.

How does it work ⚙️ #

Three major pieces are needed, everything else is up to you. These pieces are:

View #

It represents the UI of the application devoid of any application logic. The view model sends notifications to the view to update the UI whenever the state changes.

ViewModel #

Which holds the state and the events of the view. Additionally, It acts as a bridge between the model and the view.

The view model is platform-independent and doesn't know its view. Therefore, it can be easily bound to a web, mobile, or desktop view.

Model #

Holds app data and the business logic. It consists of the business logic (e.g. local and remote data sources, model classes, and repositories). They’re usually simple classes.

When should you use PMVVM? 👌

To keep it simple, use it whenever your widget has its own events that can mutate the state directly e.g: pages, posts, ...etc.

Usage 👨‍💻 #

The best way to get to know PMVVM is to get your hands dirty and try it out. Let's look at the code:

  • Build your ViewModel.
class MyViewModel extends ViewModel {
  int counter = 0;

  // Optional
  @override
  void init() {
    // It's called after the MVVM widget's initState is called
  }

  // Optional
  @override
  void onBuild() {
    // A callback when the `build` method of the view is called.
  }

  void increase() {
    counter++;
    notifyListeners();
  }
}
  • You can also access the context inside the ViewModel directly.
class MyViewModel extends ViewModel {
  @override
  void init() {
    var height = MediaQuery.of(context).size.height;
  }
}
  • Declare MVVM inside your builder.
class MyWidget extends StatelessWidget {
  const MyWidget({Key key}) : super(key: key);

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return MVVM<MyViewModel>(
      view: () => _MyView(),
      viewModel: MyViewModel(),
    );
  }
}
  • Build your View.
// StatelessView

class _MyView extends StatelessView<MyViewModel> {
  /// Set [reactive] to [false] if you don't want the view to listen to the ViewModel.
  /// It's [true] by default.
  const _MyView({Key key}) : super(key: key, reactive: true);

  @override
  Widget render(context, vmodel) {
    return Column(
      mainAxisAlignment: MainAxisAlignment.center,
      crossAxisAlignment: CrossAxisAlignment.center,
      children: <Widget>[
        Text(vmodel.counter.toString()),
        SizedBox(height: 24),
        RaisedButton(onPressed: vmodel.increase, child: Text('Increase')),
      ],
  );
}

// HookView

class _MyView extends HookView<MyViewModel> {
  /// Set [reactive] to [false] if you don't want the view to listen to the ViewModel.
  /// It's [true] by default.
  const _MyView({Key key}) : super(key: key, reactive: true);

  @override
  Widget render(context, vmodel) {
    return Column(
      mainAxisAlignment: MainAxisAlignment.center,
      crossAxisAlignment: CrossAxisAlignment.center,
      children: <Widget>[
        Text(vmodel.counter.toString()),
        SizedBox(height: 24),
        RaisedButton(onPressed: vmodel.increase, child: Text('Increase')),
      ],
    );
  }
}

If your view is simple, you can use the MVVVM.builder instead:

class MyWidget extends StatelessWidget {
  const MyWidget({Key key}) : super(key: key);

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return MVVM<MyViewModel>.builder(
      viewModel: viewModel,
      viewBuilder: (_, vm) {
        return Text(
          vm.counter.toString(),
          textDirection: TextDirection.ltr,
        );
      },
    );
  }
}

Advanced 🚀 #

Immutability & Observability 🧐 #

PMVVM supports immutability as well, it also allows you to observe the changes/actions applied to the variables through the Observable class.

  • First wrap your variable with the Observable:
/// 'MyCounter' is an alias for the variable, this comes handy in logging
final counter = Observable<int>('MyCounter');

// Or

final counter = Observable.initialized(0, 'MyCounter');
final counter = 0.observable('MyCounter');
  • Then apply actions to it:
counter.setValue(counter.value + 1, action: 'INCREASE');
  • Lastly, start consuming this observable:
/// NOTE: make sure that it's initialized before using the [value] getter
/// by checking [counter.hasValue] or just use [counter.valueOrNull] or [counter.valueOrDefault]

counter.value;

counter.stream.listen((value) { });   

You can also make the view model observe, unobserve to any list of observables, or clear clearAllObservers

class CounterPageVM extends ViewModel {
  final counter = 0.reactive('MyCounter');

  @override
  void init() {
    observe([counter]);
  }

  void increase() {
    counter.setValue(counter.value + 1, action: 'INCREASE');
  }
}

Note 📌

The observe method has an optional boolean parameter reset that clears all the previous observers before listening to the new observables.

Observable API #

Getter / MethodDescription
valueReturns the current value of the observable
valueOrNullReturns the current value or null if it's not initialized
prevValueReturns the previous value from history if it exists
hasValueChecks whether the observable is initialized or not
historyReturns a history of all actions applied to the observable
streamReturns a stream for the observable values
valueOrDefaultA method that returns the current value or default if it's not initialized
setValueA method to change the current value of the observable
logA method that allows changing the shape of the logs
clearHistoryRemove all stored actions
resetLogCallbackTo clear the custom log functions.

Patterns 🧩 #

In this section Let's discuss some patterns that can help your view model to access your widget properties:

  • Naive approach: Using cascade notation to initialize your view model with the widget properties. The problem with this approach is that your view model becomes non-reactive when the widget's dependencies (properties) are updated.
class MyWidget extends StatelessWidget {
  const MyWidget({Key key, this.varName}) : super(key: key);

  final String varName;

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return MVVM<MyViewModel>(
      view: () => _MyView(),
      viewModel: MyViewModel()..varName = varName,
    );
  }
}
  • Clean approach: similar to ReactJS, you should create a properties class, in which all your widget properties are kept.

my_widget.props.dart

class MyWidgetProps {
  MyWidgetProps({required this.name});

  final String name;
}

my_widget.vm.dart

class MyWidgetVM extends ViewModel {
  late MyWidgetProps props;

  @override
  void init() {
    props = context.fetch<MyWidgetProps>();
  }
}

my_widget.view.dart

class MyWidget extends StatelessWidget {
  MyWidget({
    Key? key,
    required String name,
  })  : props = MyWidgetProps(name: name),
        super(key: key);

  final MyWidgetProps props;

  Widget build(context) {
    return Provider.value(
      value: props,
      child: MVVM<MyWidgetVM>(
        view: () => _MyWidgetView(),
        viewModel: MyWidgetVM(),
      ),
    );
  }
}

More about PMVVM🎯 #

  • You can use context.fetch<T>(listen: true/false) which is equivalent to Provider.of<T>(context)
  • You can use the PMVVMConfig to control enableLogging and trackObservablesHistory. If trackObservablesHistory is false, the observables won't store the history of the actions applied to them.
  • To make the view ignore the state notifications from the ViewModel , set reactive to false when you are constructing the StatelessView or HookView :
class _MyView extends StatelessView<MyViewModel> {
  const _MyView({Key key}) : super(key: key, reactive: false);
  ....
}
  • ViewModel Lifecycle methods (All of them are optional)
  /// A callback after the MVVM widget's initState is called.
  ///
  /// See also:
  ///
  ///  * [onDependenciesChange], which is called when the MVVM widget's [didChangeDependencies]
  ///    is called.
  void init() {}

  /// A callback when the MVVM widget's [didChangeDependencies] is called.
  ///
  /// For example, when `context.fetch<T>(listen: true/false)` is used within the view model,
  /// then the [onDependenciesChange] method will be called every time these dependencies change.
  void onDependenciesChange() {}

  /// A callback when the `build` method of the view is called.
  void onBuild() {}

  /// A callback when the view is mounted.
  void onMount() {}

  /// A callback when the view is unmounted
  void onUnmount() {}

  /// Event callback when the application is visible and responding to user input.
  void onResume() {}

  /// Event callback when the application is not currently visible to the user, not responding to
  /// user input, and running in the background.
  void onPause() {}

  /// Event callback when the application is in an inactive state and is not receiving user input.
  /// 
  /// For [IOS] only.
  void onInactive() {}

  /// Event callback when the application is still hosted on a flutter engine but
  /// is detached from any host views.
  ///
  /// For [Android] only.
  void onDetach() {}

FAQ 🤔 #

  • Can I use it in production?
    • Yep! It's stable and ready to rock
  • What is the difference between Stacked & PMVVM since both adopt the same principles?
StackedPMVVM
You can't access the BuildContext from the ViewModel.BuildContext can be accessed inside the ViewModel using:
- Provider.of<T>(context)
- context.watch<T>()
- context.read<T>()
- context.select<T, R>(R cb(T value))
You should implement the Initialisable interface to call initialise.init event is called by default, all you need to do is to override it (optional).
There is no build method in the ViewModel.onBuild method is called by default every time the View is rebuilt, and you can override it to implement yours (optional).
It over-wraps provider with many ViewModels like FutureViewModelStreamViewModel, …etc. Which provider & flutter_hooks are built to do without any wrapping.It doesn’t over-wrap provider package with such classes. Instead, you can use StreamProvider/FutureProvider or Hooks which gives you the flexibility to make the most out of provider & flutter_hooks.

In summary, PMVVM is simpler & cleaner, there is no over-wrapping, and idioms are more clear.

Dependencies 📦 #

  • provider
  • flutter_hooks
  • tint

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A clean & simple MVVM solution for state management using Provider package.

Repository (GitHub)
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Documentation

API reference

License

Icon for licenses.MIT (LICENSE)

Dependencies

flutter, flutter_hooks, provider, tint

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